IEEE IoT Initiative Launches “IoT Scenarios” Contributor Program to Explore Real World Applications and Foster IoT Architecture Development

Interactive platform allows users to engage with use cases, service descriptions, business models, and reference implementations key to developing a vibrant IoT industry. IEEE, the world’s largest professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity, announced today that the Future Directions IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) Initiative has launched a new program to foster the …

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The Internet Must Be Bigger Than Facebook | David Weinberger | The Atlantic

It is not enough for the Internet to succeed. It must succeed inevitably.

Or so many of us Internet Triumphalists in the mid-1990s thought. For, if the march of the Internet’s new values were not unstoppable, then it would surely be stopped by our age-old inclinations and power structures. The Net, as we called it then, would become just another venue for the familiar patterns of marginalization, exclusion, oppression, and ignorance.

Now I’m afraid the argument for inevitability that kept me, and others, hopeful for 20 years no longer holds.

It’s a simple argument that we can all the Argument from Architecture:

The Internet’s architecture is highly unusual.The Internet’s architecture reflects certain values.Our use of the Net, based on that architecture, strongly encourages the adoption of those values.Therefore, the Internet tends to transform us and our institutions in ways that reflect those values.And that’s a good thing.

Premise No. 1 makes me a cyber-exceptionalist. Premise No. 3 assumes there’s weak causality at work, making me some flavor of technodeterminist. The sweep of the transformations promised in Premise No. 4 results from the cyber-exceptionalism of Premise No. 1. Because I like the values referred to in No. 2, Premise No. 5 asserts my cyber-utopianism.

I still believe the Net’s architecture is exceptional and reflects values that Western liberals like me take as fundamental. That architecture moves packets of information around without any central management or control. It moves them without favoritism based on content, sender, recipient, or type of application. It enables us to connect with one another and with what we create for each other without asking permission.

 

The Internet’s architecture therefore values open access to information, the democratic and permission-free ability to read and to post, an open market of ideas and businesses, and provides a framework for bottom-up collaboration among equals.

In the past I would have said that so long as this architecture endures, so will the transfer of values from that architecture to the systems that run on top of it. But while the Internet’s architecture is still in place, the values transfer may actually be stifled by the many layers that have been built on top of it.

In short, my fear is that the Internet has been paved. You can spend an entire lifetime on the Internet and never feel its loam between your toes.

 

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A Simple Explanation Of ‘The Internet Of Things’ via @forbes

The “Internet of things” (IoT) is becoming an increasingly growing topic of conversation both in the workplace and outside of it. It’s a concept that not only has the potential to impact how we live but also how we work.  But what exactly is the “Internet of things” and what […]

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Time Spent Reading Stories Now a Facebook Algorithm Signal

Facebook announced it has added a new ranking factor to its News Feed algorithm. In addition to likes, comments, and shares — Facebook will now take into account the time people spend with a piece of content.

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Google testing the waters in Cuba | Nancy Scola | POLITICO.com

A Google executive is headed to Cuba this weekend to explore bringing better Internet access to the island, and the search giant has made a related proposal to the Cuban government, according to a State Department official.

It’s the latest sign that U.S. tech companies are testing the seriousness of Cuba’s interest in opening up to outside investment after President Barack Obama’s announcement of a historic thaw in relations and the Raúl Castro-led government’s recent pledge to bring Internet access to all Cubans by 2020.

The Google executive, Brett Perlmutter, is a New York-based member of the company’s Google Ideas unit aimed at helping to solve the world’s biggest tech problems. He’s taking part in a five-day trip to Havana with about a dozen other U.S. business representatives and “will focus on helping the Cuban government think through their publicly-stated goal of improving Internet access,” a company spokesperson said.

Google declined to say much else about its work in Cuba. But a senior State Department official, speaking on background, said the search giant has made a proposal to the Cuban government. “We don’t know what they’ve proposed, but we do know they’ve proposed something,” the official said.

 

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Hmmm! Any plan to replace economic blockage for walled gardens?

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Net neutrality takes effect Friday; ISPs scramble to avoid complaints | Jon Brodkin | Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission’s net neutrality rules take effect Friday this week, and they’ve already had a noticeable impact on the behavior of Internet service providers.

The FCC passed the rules on February 26, but they didn’t get published in the Federal Register until April 13. The publication date started the 60-day waiting period until the rules take effect, and it has been a busy two months.

The latest news occurred today when AT&T and network operator Cogent announced a new interconnection agreement for exchanging Internet traffic. If AT&T Internet users were experiencing trouble reaching websites, this could resolve that problem for any Internet traffic traveling from Cogent to AT&T.

The “long-term, bilateral interconnection agreement for their IP networks… will not only improve efficiency of traffic exchange but also create additional capacity and new interconnection locations between the networks, allowing customers to continue to experience high-quality performance and network reliability,” the companies said.

Interconnection disputes weren’t even the primary impetus for passing net neutrality rules. The FCC order’s most specific guidelines prevent Internet service providers from blocking or throttling traffic or prioritizing content in exchange for payment. But interconnection is where the rules are having their most visible effect.

The FCC’s blocking and throttling bans don’t cover interconnection problems, in which traffic gets slowed down because there isn’t enough capacity to transfer it all from one network to another. ISPs have been demanding payments from companies like Cogent in exchange for upgrading the network links, and the FCC didn’t ban those payments. But the commission said it would let companies file complaints against ISPs to determine whether they are making unreasonable demands and harming consumers by not upgrading infrastructure.

 

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The World’s Email Encryption Software Relies on One Guy, Who is Going Broke | Julia Angwin | NetworkWorld.com

The man who built the free email encryption software used by whistleblower Edward Snowden, as well as hundreds of thousands of journalists, dissidents and security-minded people around the world, is running out of money to keep his project alive.

Werner Koch wrote the software, known as Gnu Privacy Guard, in 1997, and since then has been almost single-handedly keeping it alive with patches and updates from his home in Erkrath, Germany. Now 53, he is running out of money and patience with being underfunded.

“I’m too idealistic,” he told me in an interview at a hacker convention in Germany in December. “In early 2013 I was really about to give it all up and take a straight job.” But then the Snowden news broke, and “I realized this was not the time to cancel.”

Like many people who build security software, Koch believes that offering the underlying software code for free is the best way to demonstrate that there are no hidden backdoors in it giving access to spy agencies or others. However, this means that many important computer security tools are built and maintained by volunteers.

Now, more than a year after Snowden’s revelations, Koch is still struggling to raise enough money to pay himself and to fulfill his dream of hiring a full-time programmer. He says he’s made about $25,000 per year since 2001 — a fraction of what he could earn in private industry. In December, he launched a fundraising campaign that has garnered about $43,000 to date — far short of his goal of $137,000 — which would allow him to pay himself a decent salary and hire a full-time developer.

The fact that so much of the Internet’s security software is underfunded is becoming increasingly problematic. Last year, in the wake of the Heartbleed bug, I wrote that while the U.S. spends more than $50 billion per year on spying and intelligence, pennies go to Internet security. The bug revealed that an encryption program used by everybody from Amazon to Twitter was maintained by just four programmers, only one of whom called it his full-time job. A group of tech companies stepped in to fund it.

 

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Source: www.networkworld.com

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Time Again to Point Out that Title II is Not Net Neutrality, and that Net Neutrality is not Utility | John Bergmayer | Public Knowledge

Title II is not net neutrality.

This post is doing something that well-trained advocates know is often inadvisable: highlighting your opponents’ arguments in order to rebut them. This exercise can give those arguments more visibility and credence than they merit. However, in this case the arguments are so widespread it’s worth addressing them head-on. So, again: Title II is not net neutrality. Not only that, but net neutrality is not “utility” regulation.

This is a point Public Knowledge has made again and again: While Title II of the Communications Act provides the firmest legal grounding for net neutrality rules, Title II and net neutrality are not one and the same. While Title II contains broad prohibitions on unjust and unreasonable conduct by telecommunications providers, the FCC has to determine exactly what that means as applied to a given service, such as broadband. Practices that were allowed for other telecommunications services, like telephony, might be unreasonable for broadband–and vice versa. While PK has argued that the FCC should use its Title II authority to enact net neutrality rules for broadband, we have never said the Title II is useful only for net neutrality. Title II will also help the FCC refocus its universal service program on broadband more directly, protect subscriber privacy, and ensure public safety and network reliability, among other things.

Thus one of the troubling things about the recent net neutrality bill sponsored by Senator Thune is not just that it falls short as a net neutrality bill–it also takes away the FCC’s authority to use Title II for other aspects of broadband. Net neutrality is not the same as universal service or public safety. We are not “moving the goalposts” and expanding the definition of net neutrality by pointing out that a bill that ostensibly protects net neutrality could have negative consequences for broadband in areas other than net neutrality. While we agree that certain provisions of Title II should be forborne from (or put in abeyance) by the FCC with respect to broadband since they either have no applicability or are not needed for the broadband market today, the FCC should not voluntarily give up the authority it needs to protect broadband consumers in areas beyond net neutrality.

 

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Source: www.publicknowledge.org

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The revolution will NOT be in Open Data | Open Knowledge Foundation Blog

A common narrative in many “open” development projects goes along the lines of “provide access to data/information –> some magic occurs –> we see positive change.” In essence, because of the newness of this field, we only know what we THINK happens, we don’t know what REALLY happens because there is a paucity of documentation and evidence.

 

It’s problematic that we often use the terms data, information, and knowledge interchangeably, because:

Data is NOT knowledge.

Data is NOT information.

Information is NOT knowledge.

Knowledge IS what you know. It’s the result of information you’ve consumed, your education, your culture, beliefs, religion, experience – it’s intertwined with the society within which you live. 

Source: blog.okfn.org

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Veja post “Sala de aula invertida” publicado no igovsp

Sou fã incondicional do blog igovsp. Republico post muito interessante “Sala de aula invertida”, uma experiência vivenciada e compartilhada por Isabel de Meiroz Dias. Trata-se da sala de aula pós power point, segundo a autora. Eu diria que é pós sala de aula, uma conversa que estimula pesquisa.

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